Each and every moment holds the possibility of simultaneous construction and deconstruction – each and every moment is unique...
Improvisation, which has always played an integral role within folk and theatrical dance, became more visible within the arts in the 1960’s with the practice of postmodern dance, particularly in the work of Steve Paxton, Trisha Brown and Anna Halprin. Not much has been written about improvisation, since it is so elusive. Not only is improvisation ephemeral, it also represents a phenomenon, in a constant state of change. Trying to pinpoint exactly, in words, just what dance improvisation is, seems at times to betray the medium itself, for language is linear and improvisation is not. The Moment of Movement by Lynne Anne Blom & L. Tarin Chaplin
Improvisation represents an art form, which promotes innovative creativity, and in so doing encourages appreciation for expressions of originality and distinction. Questions raised may have many answers - solutions directly followed by the exact opposite are common. A multitude of models for execution exist, where depth and sincerity run parallel with process, structure and technique beyond the masks and clichés, assisting the practitioner in the quest for that which is unique. Improvisation satisfies the need for interaction and knowledge within the modern dramatic arts, within society at large, not to mention the human factor...

Cut a hole in a bag filled with seeds of any kind and place the bag where there is wind...
Yoko Ono 1961

VARIA recommends Force of Nature trailer featuring Kirstie Simson, award-winning dancer…